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Your Path To A Law Career

Only physicians and college professors require more education than lawyers. So, if you want to be a lawyer, you’ll need to invest four years in college and three more years afterwards.

The path begins in high school. Students aspiring to the profession of law should work especially diligently in English classes to develop skills in communication, analysis, and the formulation of arguments; the core skills every lawyer needs. Those who aspire to be trial lawyers might want to consider becoming involved in theatre or debate, both of which offer opportunities for significant skills development.

The next step on the road to becoming a lawyer is college. Contrary to popular belief, it is not necessary to major in pre-law or political science, but good grades are important, as top law schools are highly selective.

Once you graduate from college, you must take the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT). It measures logical thinking skills, analytical reasoning, reading comprehension, and writing ability. Because LSAT scores play an important role in law school admission, many law school applicants take preparatory classes before taking the test.

It’s best to choose at least four to six law schools to apply to. A minimum of two should be institutions to which your grades and LSAT scores would seem to ensure your admission.

While in law school, most students spend some time working in the field to help them develop professional contacts and decide which specialty area(s) are of the greatest interest to them.

Once you finish law school, you’ll need to prepare for and pass the state Bar exam. The Bar will test your knowledge of state and federal law. Once you If you pass it, you’ll be licensed to practice law in your state (and perhaps in some others).

There’s no quick and easy way to become a lawyer. But, there are good reasons why so many people complete the rigorous path to a career in law. In addition to relatively high earnings, lawyers enjoy the opportunity to practice in many specialties (criminal, civil, international, and copyright law, for example), to work in business, or to serve in govenment and political posts.